luka

Well-known member
i tried to watch mirror the other day and although it looked fantastic it was only about ten minutes before i thought fuck it and went back on the internet
 

version

Well-known member
i think i was referring to Tarkovsky and Patrick Kellior. but as you say watching this stuff becomes more and more of an effort with every passing day.
There's a loose movement or style called 'slow cinema' that's a sort of tributary of what Schrader termed 'transcendental style' back in the early 70s and he gave an interview a few years ago saying he thought it was now a dead end and on the way out,


Is it possible to make a spiritual film without slowing down time?

I don’t think you can have fast spirituality. The whole concept of spirituality involves some slowing down. That’s like saying can we do fast meditation.

The concept of spirituality does involve a stepping away from the maelstrom of activity and the maelstrom of action and empathy. Action and empathy are the two primary tools of a filmmaker. That’s why they’re called moving pictures: picture have empathy and movement has movement. So what happens when you say, “I’m going to show you inaction and characters who have no personality so you can’t empathize with them?” Now you’re fighting against the medium and its strong points. Obviously, not many people try this because it’s not a terribly commercial enterprise.

To go to that place, you have to be willing to risk people walking out. That’s a scary feeling, because every instinct you have as a filmmaker is to do anything possible to keep people in the theatre. As a filmmaker it’s a lot harder not to move the camera than it is to move the camera.
 

version

Well-known member
'We live in a world where you endure so much narrative. How many hours of narrative have you seen, as opposed to your father or your children? I’m just guessing, but your father has maybe seen 10,000 hours, and you’ve seen maybe 100,000 hours. There aren’t that many plots. Finally, narrative gets exhausting, and you say to somebody, “I got an idea for a film about four lesbians adrift in a boat,” and they say, “Oh! You mean that four-lesbians- adrift-in-a-boat idea!” There’s not many new ideas any more.

As a result, people start using time in a different way. One direction the film world is going toward is hyper-speed. We’ve retrained our brains to perceive imagery at this level. Now if you see a film that was made 30 years ago, you think it was a slow film. Films are being cut and made much faster now. One reaction against that trend is to go the other way. If anybody walks from one place to another, have them walk real slow. That’s a push back against the Tony Scott trend of blitzkrieg editing. One of Scott’s films, Domino – I don’t think anyone in that film ever completed a sentence without a splice.'
 

luka

Well-known member
computer games always seem to be the things pushing the limits of speed, how fast the eye can track motion and react etc
 

version

Well-known member
computer games always seem to be the things pushing the limits of speed, how fast the eye can track motion and react etc
Those futuristic racing games like Wipeout.

There's a bit in The Phantom Menace where you're told Anakin Skywalker's the only human capable of podracing because of how in touch with The Force he is and I swear you could say the same of the N64 game. The thing was ridiculous.
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
Stan will like this,

Once, while the boyfriend carved a roast chicken, Burroughs began to describe the right way to stab a man to death and he was graphically illustrating it with this large carving knife. His head was filled with all sorts of bizarre bits and pieces culled from "Believe It or Not" features and police magazines and all kinds of obscure sources. But he was very interested in scientific or technological underpinnings. I think, in a way, I share that with him. I've always felt that science in general is a way of ordering one's imaginative response to the world.

@Clinamenic
Yeah I think of science very similarly, as a sprawling conceptual framework, collectively built and perpetually renovated by humanity, which serves as a sort of operating system for knowledge and imagination. It's why science is so important to me. I think, without science as we now know it, one could still arrive at deep and intimate understandings of the universe and existence, but with science it feels much less subjective and ambiguous.
 

version

Well-known member
"He had an incredible mastery of himself ... except, ah, except in the car ... he loved to drive, he was handsome, full of women, even when I met him he loved cars, he loved speed. So when there was an imbecile [slowing him down] I saw a being next to me, like a demon, coming out of Jean's head. You cannot imagine, it was something incredible, scary. It was a total change of personality... "
I'm enjoying these anecdotes about the reckless driving of theorists,

"Lacan himself drove fast. Once, he took Martin Heidegger and his wife, Elfride, on a day trip to Chartres to visit the cathedral. Though Heidegger was a hero of his, Lacan continued to drive at his characteristic high speed despite Elfride’s frantic protestations. As the story goes, Lacan was completely silent on the long drive back as he pressed harder and harder on the gas pedal."

 
Top