No Future for the GOP?

vimothy

yurp
I doubt that crypto is inherently right wing as much as accidentally right wing. it just so happens that atm, crypto is on the outside in a similar place to alt right types and theres a significant overlap bw the two spaces due to reasons that are largely partisan
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
I doubt that crypto is inherently right wing as much as accidentally right wing. it just so happens that atm, crypto is on the outside in a similar place to alt right types and theres a significant overlap bw the two spaces due to reasons that are largely partisan
Within crypto culture, there is plenty of appeal to liberals, and some even pseudo-communist stuff, IE collective decision-making without the need for elected representatives, but a lot of that depends on scale. Regenerative Finance is also a thing, with stuff like tokenized carbon credits. I don’t know much about it, but I have some doubts as to the actual practicality of the current state of the art there
 

vimothy

yurp
kind of a deep and interesting question though, isnt it? does crypto inherently appeal to alt-right, and if so, why
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
I agree that it’s incidentally appealing to alt right, insofar as the alt right has extra-institutional method and agendas. Honestly I suspect BAYC could have also been an effective funding source for them too, in addition to a masterpiece of trolling.
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
I do think crypto is inherently libertarian in some ways, and that may explain the right wing appeal
 

toko

Well-known member
money as a focus is loosely grafted onto right wing values vs community as a focus for left wing
i think theres more to it. crypto mostly attracts anti-statists, (those who wish to create an order with a weak or non-existent centralized state). left leaning crypto thinkers generally value inclusivity and community coordination outside mainstream institutions. they are almost always left leaning libertarians. the right leaning contingent focus on more classic "American libertarian" values, "sovereign individual", unalienable property rights, etc etc. both focus on decentralized and incentive based systems. Both aren't opposed to money and capital as incentives- but their ultimate aims are different. for the left leaning, decenteralized money and money-based systems empower communities to better coordinate to solve issues but for right leaning money these systems are used to empower the individual and their "natural rights."
 
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catalog

Well-known member
You just need to bisect the horizontal line of left-right with the vertical line of libertarian-authoritarian in that case and they sit above the line.

All these polarities are bollocks really though, crypto is just flash Harry's making some quick cash. I reckon the left leaners are not really left leaners. Making money, especially where its so unconnected to an analogue in reality, is an inherently right wing thing in my head.

But that's just my probably very uninformed opinion.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
i think theres more to it. crypto mostly attracts anti-statists, (those who wish to create an order with a weak or non-existent centralized state). left leaning crypto thinkers generally value inclusivity and community coordination outside mainstream institutions. they are almost always left leaning libertarians. the right leaning contingent focus on more classic "American libertarian" values, "sovereign individual", unalienable property rights, etc etc. both focus on decentralized and incentive based systems. Both aren't opposed to money and capital as incentives- but their ultimate aims are different. for the left leaning, decenteralized money and money-based systems empower communities to better coordinate to solve issues but for right leaning money these systems are used to empower the individual and their "natural rights."
I'd be able to take self-described "libertarians" more seriously were it not for the fact that about 95% of the time (number picked arbitrarily out of the air but I expect it's fairly accurate) what they really mean is that they want unlimited personal freedom and minimal taxation (preferably none at all) for themselves and people who look more or less like them, and any level of authoritarian control, up to and including fascism, for everyone else.

It's certainly no coincidence that these supposedly libertarian "think tanks"/pressure groups always turn out to have links to the far right.
 
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toko

Well-known member
I'd be able to take self-described "libertarians" more seriously were it not for the case that about 95% of the time (number picked arbitrarily out of the air but I expect it's fairly accurate) what they really mean is that they want unlimited personal freedom and minimal taxation (preferably none at all) for themselves and people who look more or less like them, and any level of authoritarian control, up to and including fascism, for everyone else.

It's certainly no coincidence that these supposedly libertarian "think tanks"/pressure groups always turn out to have links to the far right.
i would disagree with that 95 percent. I think there is a geniune number of gullible and naive people who really believe that the privatization of everything would be better. i was at some point. theres a kind of simplicity and first principles approach to it, ("blame everything on the state"/basic natural rights) that my early high school self liked. it offered a clear road to a more ideal goal, "dismantle the government" that other ideologies couldn't really provide. but once i read more and actually interacted with libertarian types I realized that for many ideology was just a justification to accumulate as much capital as possible and that many, but not all had an attitude of "fuck the rest of the world as long as I get mine." also the first political book I had ever read was nozick so its no surprise there.
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
money as a focus is loosely grafted onto right wing values vs community as a focus for left wing
You see this post I made? Making the case for distributed ledgers as a possible infrastructure for communitarian capitalism.

I think the right wing appeal would be self-sovereignty, and the left wing appeal would be community. Obviously neither is an exclusively partisan value, but they seem to foregrounded by conservative and liberal parties respectively, at least in the US

 

catalog

Well-known member
libertarian thinking is sort of a core american value, anti-tyranny in roots. that's why the right to bear arms is number 2 in bill of rights and will never be overturned unless there's a new revolution
 

Leo

Well-known member

On Monday, from the pages of his weekly New York Post column, Piers Morgan held up a grenade, pulled out the pin, and lobbed it in the direction of Mar-a-Lago. “Ron DeSantis is showing himself to be a formidable and dynamic political operator,” Morgan wrote of the 43-year-old Florida governor and presumed 2024 presidential hopeful. “So, by almost any political metric you choose, this guy’s a far better option for leading the Republicans into the 2024 election than Donald Trump…He’s just younger, fresher, and more exciting than the aging, raging gorilla who’s become a whiny, democracy-defying bore.” In his kicker, Morgan twisted the knife to and fro: “The game’s up for the Donald…It’s time Republicans put their faith in the Ronald.”...Morgan’s takedown was wholly consistent with the wider message that has lately been blaring out from the opinion sections of Murdoch’s American newspapers: Dump Trump.

What to make of all this? As someone in the Murdoch orbit put it, “Rupert’s a pragmatic guy. He knows better than anybody how to read political tea leaves. It’s fairly self-evident that quite a few people in the firmament have begun to challenge the previously supported collective viewpoint about Trump. It’s understood now that the gloves are off. As he lashes out, it just makes it easier for people to hit back.”

Elaborating with a bit more nuance, the podcaster and former senior Obama adviser Dan Pfeiffer said in a recent appearance on CNN’s Reliable Sources, “The creation of this entire right-wing media apparatus was designed for one purpose: to elect Republicans to office. And there is a strong current among some Republican political operatives, and some folks in the conservative movement, that Donald Trump is not their best chance to win—because of his role in what happened before, because he seems so obsessed with looking backward as opposed to forward. So this is not a moral statement from Rupert Murdoch’s papers about Donald Trump being bad or the dangers of January 6. They just want another candidate, perhaps Ron DeSantis, to be in a position to allow them to control the White House again, by any means necessary.”
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
They've just overturned Roe v. Wade.
Interesting to see the Fox News take on it:


At least 13 Republican-led states have already passed "trigger laws," in the event Roe is overturned, that would immediately restrict access to abortion if the Supreme Court went so far as to overturn the 50-year precedent.

Georgia, Iowa, Ohio and South Carolina all have laws banning abortions after the six-week mark, which have been ruled unconstitutional but would likely be revisited if Roe is overturned, the Guttmacher Institute, a pro-abortion research group, has reported.

On the other hand, pro-choice advocates will have to work to codify Roe or enact looser abortion restrictions by passing state-level legislation.

New York passed a bill in 2018 designed to codify Roe, and other blue states are expected to follow suit after the Supreme Court's ruling.

Public opinion polling has also indicated that despite that more than six in 10 registered voters think the court should uphold Roe, the majority of Americans are in favor of some restrictions on abortion.
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής

The Supreme Court in a 6-3 decision on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the landmark ruling that established the constitutional right to abortion in the U.S. in 1973.

The court's controversial but expected ruling gives individual states the power to set their own abortion laws without concern of running afoul of Roe, which for nearly half a century had permitted abortions during the first two trimesters of pregnancy.

Almost half the states are expected to outlaw or severely restrict abortion as a result of the Supreme Court's decision. Other states plan to maintain more liberal rules governing the termination of pregnancies.

"The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," a syllabus of the opinion said.

Justice Samuel Alito, as expected, wrote the majority opinion that tossed out Roe. He was joined in that judgment by the five other conservatives on the high court, including Chief Justice John Roberts.
 
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